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ECHO Affordable Housing Questionnaire: Candidates’ Responses


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ECHO Colorado – East County Housing Coalition recently conducted a survey with the Erie candidates running for Mayor and Trustee. Surveys were sent out on a Monday via email, and were asked to be received by that Friday of the same week. Follow up requests were made for those not received. Blank answers mean the candidates did not respond. 

Yellow Scene Magazine has agreed to reprint that questionnaire as part of our Community Corner. Community Corner is open to non-profits and other organizations, as well as residents to discuss important legislative and social policies. 

The following candidates did not provide a response:

  • Jeff Haverkate
  • Ryan Kenward
  • Andrew Sawusch
  • Kelly Zuniga

Dan Hoback

Explain to us your own values about community and the need for affordable housing.

Diversity goes beyond race, gender, gender identity, age, etc. It embodies all aspects of socio-economic levels and demographics. I want people of all walks to be able to live in Erie, whether they work outside the town, from home, or within the town. I love the phrase “workplace housing.” We need affordable living options for young people starting out, local workers, teachers, police, seniors, and those facing life changes like divorce, that can stretch budgets.

Do you know what the affordable housing goal is for Erie, and do you believe the Town’s efforts will meet those affordable housing needs?

I believe we have a goal of 12%, but I don’t know how codified that is, and I may just be recalling a general benchmark other towns consider. I have a lot to learn, but am willing to grow in this area, as it is currently at crisis stage, in my opinion. We need to aim high, as we have plenty of land to work with. I don’t mean, “hey, all this land, let’s make developers do ABC…. but it affords us more leeway and creativity than infill projects.

What are the impacts on families when housing for young people is unaffordable in our area? Do you think this can be prevented through policy changes and funding? If so, what programs, and what level of funding would this require?

Families that cannot afford to live here must obviously choose other areas. That impacts their lifestyle with commute times, distances to see family, driving costs and pollution. It also hurts local businesses that need reliable staff. People are more reliable when it’s easy to get to work. We need to codify in our ordinances and planning regulations getting diversified AFFORDABLE housing. We just do. This is not my strong suit, but I am quickly learning from Justin Brooks, who has a passion for it.

Would you support a program to create accessory dwelling units that could remain affordable? [YES]  

In all honesty, I’m not sure what that program would look like, but I know other communities have them, so I don’t see why Erie can’t.

Would you support changing single-family zoning to allow for more mid-density housing such as townhomes and duplexes on lots that have room for them? [YES] | As an elected official would you take a leadership role on this?  [YES]

I am on record for saying we rezone too much in the direction developers want. We need to push for what’s best for our residents before they’re priced out on property taxes alone.

What do you think are the impacts to our community and our environment when the vast majority of workers commute from elsewhere? What role can affordable housing play in eliminating those impacts?

Traffic congestion increases; pollution increases; auto insurance rates increase; families are more stressed; businesses suffer from lack of staff as well as lack of local customers. Affordable housing makes it possible for people to live and work locally, without having to live 20+ miles away and commute to Erie, giving them more time to enjoy the community.

The business community struggles to find workers because of the high cost of housing. Would you be willing to meet with business leaders to ask them to support an affordable housing program for the town tied to job growth?

Yes, businesses would be a MAJOR beneficiary of affordable housing. Many entrepreneurs and small business owners want to run and grow their business strategically, not working the cash register or other tasks that don’t fit their dream.

Smart community development such as mixed-use, middle-housing, and transit-oriented development can have a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. Would you support a scoring system so that proposed developments can be scored for their contribution to reducing greenhouse gasses?

Conceptually, it sounds good. I’m not really aware of any, so would need to educate myself. Anything we can do to lessen carbon emissions and increase mass transit starts off ahead of the game. Our climate is in a world of hurt, and suburban sprawl is a big part of it. We need mass transit and bicycle/pedestrian-friendly towns.

What do you understand about the history of racism that has led to people of color owning less property, and thus having less wealth than white people?

I know it’s embedded deep. People of color in the US started off at a disadvantage, from Native Americans to Blacks and Latinos. By the time Blacks were freed from slavery, White people already owned much of the property, or at least prime property. Native Americans were literally removed from their land, receiving paltry sums at best in return… or shoved into desert oases.

Would you support procurement policies in housing that create a preference system for minority and disadvantaged businesses? [YES] / Would you take a leadership role on this? [_]

I only have so much bandwidth, so I won’t promise leadership in all areas. Working with businesses is probably what I’m best suited for, but I’m on board with doing whatever is possible to increase equity, diversity, and affordable housing.

What do you think the town can do now to enhance equity as it relates to housing?

We need to have affordable housing goals and have rules that have meat on them, so that we can hold developers accountable toward meeting the goals. I look forward to learning more about what Boulder and other nearby communities have done or learned.

What role do you think neighbors should be able to have when considering affordable housing in their neighborhood?

Not be NIMBYs, and to understand what it is, rather than be fearful that slums will be springing up citywide. Getting people involved so that they feel they have a say in how these ideas develop is important, but also a challenge.

Should Erie create an eviction legal defense program like the one in place in Boulder to help people retain their housing? It’s far less expensive than building new housing. [YES]

Again, I don’t know much about it, but it sounds appropriate. I have been a renter many times, and so much in lease contracts and the entire relationship are one-sided in favor of property owners.


Emily Baer

Explain to us your own values about community and the need for affordable housing.

Housing is a core infrastructure. A safe, warm home is foundational for the well-being of families and individuals, and is therefore foundational for a healthy, welcoming, diverse community. I think communities should include people at every stage of life from young people just starting out, to young families, empty nesters, seniors, kids moving back to be near their hometown, people of every gender, culture, distinction. As well as the workforce who do the important work of building a thriving Erie: teachers, town staff, police and firefighters, restaurant employees, grocery store workers, etc… It is estimated that 3100 people commute to Erie to work every day, coupled with our lack of transit, that has an impact on our environment and Erie’s ability to remain competitive in the job market to recruit and retain these important personnel. It will be hard to convince people to work in Erie if they are commuting past nine other viable jobs on their way here. Ensuring that we have affordable housing will address several issues in front of Erie including building a diverse, equitable, and inclusive community; staffing concerns; and sustainability.

Do you know what the affordable housing goal is for Erie, and do you believe the Town’s efforts will meet those affordable housing needs?

In 2000, Erie’s Comprehensive Plan recognized a lack of Affordable Housing options and recommended an Inclusionary Housing Ordinance, but none was adopted in the ensuing two decades. In 2021, The Board of Trustees, in collaboration with the Boulder County Regional Partnership, adopted Resolution 21-140 which expands access to Affordable Housing and set a goal of 12% of housing stock be affordable to low, moderate, and middle income households by 2035. In addition, the Erie Development Department applied for and received a planning grant from the Department of Local Affairs to assess the extent of Erie’s affordable housing needs and to develop strategies to meet those needs. Staff plans to have an Inclusionary Housing Ordinance proposal ready for review by June. It is my intention that the Board of Trustees will be able to take this data and create an effective ordinance that will help us address the housing crisis in Erie.

What are the impacts on families when housing for young people is unaffordable in our area? Do you think this can be prevented through policy changes and funding? If so, what programs, and what level of funding would this require?

A family’s access to an affordable home is critical in all aspects: physically, mentally, economically, and developmentally. When families are cost-burdened, they have to make choices about how to prioritize basic needs like food, healthcare, child care, transportation, and education. These tradeoffs are hard on families and children and have been shown to negatively affect health and behavioral and emotional development. According to Habitat for Humanity, “When home is affordable and there is more money left over for things like transportation and child care, it can open up an array of education and employment opportunities.” I think Erie has the opportunity to address these issues for families through policy changes and funding. By adopting an inclusionary Housing Ordinance with analysis funded by the DOLA grant, and the development of other housing strategies, Erie will be able to apply for a 2nd DOLA grant in 2022, part of the Affordable Housing Incentives Program, which offers seed capital to an Affordable Housing fund that assists with Affordable Housing Developments. Erie is at the beginning of this process, and we are learning so much, including what options we have in front of us to be able to fund Affordable Housing programs and what that will look like.

Would you support a program to create accessory dwelling units that could remain affordable? [YES]

It will be important for Erie to follow the data and understand what best fits our community’s Affordable Housing needs. There are several tools available for preserving affordability that surrounding municipalities utilize, like deed restrictions, adopting a one to one replacement ordinance, right of first refusals ordinances, among others.

Would you support changing single-family zoning to allow for more mid-density housing such as townhomes and duplexes on lots that have room for them? [YES] | As an elected official would you take a leadership role on this?  [YES]

I come to the Trustee table and to the conversation around Affordable Housing as an eager student, curious about the tools available to us to effectively meet the housing needs of our community.

What do you think are the impacts to our community and our environment when the vast majority of workers commute from elsewhere? What role can affordable housing play in eliminating those impacts?

DOLA estimates that 3100 people commute to Erie for work every day. This has impacts on traffic as well as our road conditions and contributes to greenhouse gas emissions. Providing affordable housing as well as mixed use, live/work situations within a community cuts down on the number of car trips while also building a sense of community by ensuring people who work here can also afford to live here.

The business community struggles to find workers because of the high cost of housing. Would you be willing to meet with business leaders to ask them to support an affordable housing program for the town tied to job growth?

Yes.

Smart community development such as mixed-use, middle-housing, and transit-oriented development can have a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. Would you support a scoring system so that proposed developments can be scored for their contribution to reducing greenhouse gasses?

Mixed use and middle housing options are important tools for addressing affordability and sustainability. In talking with voters, I know it’s a priority for Erie residents to have access to renewable energy and transit. I would like to learn more about how a scoring system would work for proposed developments for reducing greenhouse gasses.

What do you understand about the history of racism that has led to people of color owning less property, and thus having less wealth than white people?

Redlining was a standardized, racist practice by private lenders and the FHA. They refused to insure loans for people of color, in primarily black neighborhoods, deeming those homes and redlined neighborhoods, “unsafe for lending.” This prevented black families from accessing low down payment loans and prevented them from home ownership and building generational wealth. In the 1960’s, after the Fair Housing Act was passed, prohibiting racially restrictive covenants, communities used zoning laws to segregate by income, requiring larger lots which drove home prices up. Those communities also prohibited attached and higher density homes. This practice targeted marginalized communities, people of color, and denied them access to entry level homes in communities with better school districts and job opportunities.

Would you support procurement policies in housing that create a preference system for minority and disadvantaged businesses? [_] / Would you take a leadership role on this? [_]

Erie has recently hired a Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Director whose job it is to examine town policies and structures of governance and to steer the town toward DEI goals that include, “Developing new policies around housing and development that will provide the opportunity for families and individuals in different income levels and requiring such to be a part of the Town’s composition.”

It is a priority for me to engage, listen, learn, support, and understand the many intersections of DEI work, business opportunities, leadership roles, community building, housing access, and more. I support this important work and will follow the leadership of our DEI Advisory Board. It’s essential that we’re creating a culture in Erie where people feel safe, seen, heard, and valued; and that diverse businesses are welcomed and supported.

What do you think the town can do now to enhance equity as it relates to housing?

Erie Town staff are reviewing data and revising Erie’s draft Inclusionary Housing Ordinance and are slated to present this to the Board of Trustees in June of this year. Passing an Inclusionary Housing Ordinance is a good first step for addressing housing disparities and moving toward a solid plan. We can also take a look at our UDC and make sure Erie has zoning that includes Mixed Use and diverse housing densities (apartments, condos, townhouses, duplexes, etc) as options.

What role do you think neighbors should be able to have when considering affordable housing in their neighborhood?

I think there should be community outreach and engagement around affordable housing to dispel rumors and myths about increased crime and decreased property value. When the community is engaged and invested, we will all benefit.

Should Erie create an eviction legal defense program like the one in place in Boulder to help people retain their housing? It’s far less expensive than building new housing. [_]

Erie is a statutory town and as such is unable to collect excise tax, which is what Boulder uses to fund their Eviction Legal Defense Program. It will be educational to follow the data and understand how this program benefits the community as it enters its 2nd year. The 2021 ERPAS report shows 63% of evictions were avoided in eviction court, and the program provides resources for landlords and tenants. Legal representation in court proceedings is important and levels the playing field between renters and landlords. This could be a beneficial program for Erie residents moving forward. It will be interesting to watch and keep on Erie’s radar as we move toward becoming a Home Rule municipality.


Christiaan van Woudenberg

Explain to us your own values about community and the need for affordable housing.

I believe that everyone deserves to live in the community where they work; not segregated to an undesirable corner of a municipality but rather integrated into its fabric and identity.

Do you know what the affordable housing goal is for Erie, and do you believe the Town’s efforts will meet those affordable housing needs?

Erie has set a 12% goal for inclusionary housing. Given we have an existing inventory of over 8,000 rooftops of which only a handful of affordable/attainable units, I do not believe the Town’s efforts will be sufficient to meet those needs. With the cooperation of the home building industry, we must do something dramatically different to address this crisis.

What are the impacts on families when housing for young people is unaffordable in our area? Do you think this can be prevented through policy changes and funding? If so, what programs, and what level of funding would this require?

A 2020 Pew study reported that a majority of young adults were living with their parents, at the highest rates ever measured. The dramatic increases in home prices, compounded by limited inventory and predatory investors make it increasingly difficult for young families to own a home and build a positive net worth. Aggressive policies and programs to increase inventory, limit investor market manipulation, and stabilize rents will be required. I’m troubled by the prospect of rental assistance programs that only benefits landlords and not their tenants; I’d much rather fund affordable home ownership programs that generally incentivize individual home ownership.

Would you support a program to create accessory dwelling units that could remain affordable?

Yes! We have zoning in parts of Erie that allow for ADUs, and I would like to work with home builders to increase their presence in Erie.

Would you support changing single-family zoning to allow for more mid-density housing such as townhomes and duplexes on lots that have room for them? [YES] | As an elected official would you take a leadership role on this?  [YES]

no further answer

What do you think are the impacts to our community and our environment when the vast majority of workers commute from elsewhere? What role can affordable housing play in eliminating those impacts?

This excessive commuting puts a strain on our infrastructure, our wallets, our quality of life, and the climate. My goal with affordable housing is to afford everyone that works in Erie the privilege of living in our Town. When our police officers, teachers, and grocery store cashiers can enjoy a short commute (or none at all!) to work in Erie, they’ll be able to save money on transportation and spend more time and money with their families, enjoying all that Erie has to offer.

The business community struggles to find workers because of the high cost of housing. Would you be willing to meet with business leaders to ask them to support an affordable housing program for the town tied to job growth?

Absolutely.

Smart community development such as mixed-use, middle-housing, and transit-oriented development can have a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. Would you support a scoring system so that proposed developments can be scored for their contribution to reducing greenhouse gasses?

Yes, I would.

What do you understand about the history of racism that has led to people of color owning less property, and thus having less wealth than white people?

Structural racism and redlining have disadvantaged generations of BIPOC Americans from home ownership and a positive net worth. It is tragic that the COVID-19 pandemic has only increased this disparity, where white households now hold 84% of the country’s wealth while only representing 60% of the population (Source).

Would you support procurement policies in housing that create a preference system for minority and disadvantaged businesses? [YES] / Would you take a leadership role on this? [YES]

no further answer

What do you think the town can do now to enhance equity as it relates to housing?

We recently hired Alberto De Los Rios as our Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Manager, and we have established a Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Advisory Board. I look forward to working with Alberto and the DE&I board, in conjunction with the home building industry, other elected officials, and the community to establish equitable programs. I don’t have a simple answer and expect this will be one of the most challenging aspects to my second term as Trustee.

What role do you think neighbors should be able to have when considering affordable housing in their neighborhood?

They should welcome affordable housing along with the police officers, school teachers, grocery store clerks, and other workers and families that rely upon them. We must learn from the mistakes made in Denver; I have no tolerance for exclusionary zoning policies.

Should Erie create an eviction legal defense program like the one in place in Boulder to help people retain their housing? It’s far less expensive than building new housing. [YES]

no further answer

Recently after the fires, there has been evidence of price gouging by landlords taking advantage of a disaster. Do you think local governments should have a regulatory role in keeping those practices from the community?

Yes. I would support a robust set of policies to limit rental rate increases that would also curtail rising costs to landlords by limiting property tax increases and other costs tied to unrealized property values.

What role do you see for our town government in limiting vacation rentals and investor-owned property as a way of keeping housing costs down?

I know of several families that have supplemented their income by offering vacation rental rooms in their home. While this anecdote is not evidence, I would like the Town to spend some time and effort to understand how vacation rentals affect the housing market and act accordingly. The problems with investor-owned properties are clear; the challenge will be in crafting legislation and policies that adequately protect the vulnerable whilst being legally defensible.

Would you support lifting the state statute banning local governments from addressing high rents through rent stabilization measures of some kind? Are there incentives the town could provide to landlords who keep rents from skyrocketing?

Yes, this 40-year-old statute is very much contrary to the home-rule authority that most municipalities in Colorado enjoy (we hope to join them in the next few years). The housing crisis will not be solved by a uniform approach for all municipalities in Colorado; what works in Pueblo will most likely not be the right solution for Erie. As I mentioned above, policies to limit property tax increases and other costs tied to unrealized property values may be used to incent landlords to keep rental rates in check.


Justin Brooks

Explain to us your own values about community and the need for affordable housing.

When my family and I first relocated to Erie from the Houston Area 13yrs ago, we experienced severe sticker shock in attempting to find a place to live despite our both being fairly well-compensated engineers. Now that we have watched the cost of living continue to increase and the cost of housing outpace wages, I am increasingly concerned at how sustainable this latest trend can be. A large portion of our residents are either small business owners or employees who now fall within what HUD identifies as housing-distressed owners or renters. Given the challenge of running small businesses, it would not be a stretch that an Erie resident could easily be both. This spells a crisis that could lead not only to continued pricing out of our local market, but it could lead to a wave of foreclosures similar to what was seen just over a decade ago. Small businesses require a workforce to operate at their full capacity and due to many factors, that workforce has an abundance of employment options while also having an increasingly limited supply of attainable housing. Limited workers means limited operating hours, which means lower revenue and when combined with rising costs of commercial real estate leads to failed businesses and potentially bankrupt business owners. Even further, as a manager who seeks to attract and retain a number of engineers to the front range, I notice that the cost of housing has served as a deterrent to some when combined with the current market compensation. This spells the need for housing affordability at nearly all levels.

Do you know what the affordable housing goal is for Erie, and do you believe the Town’s efforts will meet those affordable housing needs?

The affordability goal for Erie is currently 12% per a resolution issued by the Board of Trustees. However, there is not mechanism currently in place that would cause the suppliers of this inventory to be motivated to provide it. Without some intentional action, along with collaboration with suppliers, we will not be able to reach 12% of our total inventory as attainable or affordable housing. I would like to see progress in this area made now, as we are starting to add inventory that is reaching 2-300% increase of price per square foot from 10 years ago.

What are the impacts on families when housing for young people is unaffordable in our area? Do you think this can be prevented through policy changes and funding? If so, what programs, and what level of funding would this require?

Housing affordability has the potential of impacting a variety of public health issues, such as food security, homelessness, physical and mental health, as well as child welfare. For parents working multiple jobs who have difficulty affording childcare, there is potentially less supervision of children who require it. Should housing continue to be out of reach, it could leave to families moving away or being unable to attain stable housing. In terms of policy changes, I do believe that a local ordinance that requires a percentage of new supply to be affordable or attainable housing is necessary. A local/expert housing affordability study is currently in process and should provide the required assessment of local needs for the Town of Erie and guide the level of minimum required affordable housing to be implemented. One program that once leveraged in Erie was the Victor Smith Senior Apartments on High St. This project was originally planned for many more units than have been built, so I look forward to working with our new Planning Director, Town Administrator and Board of Trustees to see what can be done to increase the supply of available and affordable Senior Housing in Erie, as well as generally affordable housing for non-Seniors.

Would you support a program to create accessory dwelling units that could remain affordable? [YES]

This exists today in some parts of Erie, with Erie Village and Old Town. There has been a trend of Multi-generational homes being added, though I am not sure if they are somehow restricted to either not allow rental use or if they are unaffordable. With construction costs being cited as a major obstacle to providing housing that is affordable, I would be willing to explore a variety of options that provide safe/affordable housing that serves our residents.

Would you support changing single-family zoning to allow for more mid-density housing such as townhomes and duplexes on lots that have room for them? [YES, within reason and with cooperation from land owners] | As an elected official would you take a leadership role on this?  [YES]

no further answer

What do you think are the impacts to our community and our environment when the vast majority of workers commute from elsewhere? What role can affordable housing play in eliminating those impacts?

There is a shortage of workers in local small businesses and most business owners that I have spoken to indicate that their workforce commutes from outside of town, sometime from great distances. This is unsustainable for multiple reasons, not the least of which is the cost of transportation and fuel, as well as the plentiful supply of employers across the state who are short-staffed. Affordable housing increases the level of access that workers have to their workplace, which lowers not only their living expenses, but it enables them to be more invested in the community in which they work.

The business community struggles to find workers because of the high cost of housing. Would you be willing to meet with business leaders to ask them to support an affordable housing program for the town tied to job growth?

Yes, I have already started these conversations with a few local business owners who also see this as an economic issue for our Town.

Smart community development such as mixed-use, middle-housing, and transit-oriented development can have a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. Would you support a scoring system so that proposed developments can be scored for their contribution to reducing greenhouse gasses?

The concept of scoring for greenhouse gas emissions is not one that I am familiar with, but I would like to learn more and how it can serve our local assessment of not only housing needs but the array of solutions that may be offered.

What do you understand about the history of racism that has led to people of color owning less property, and thus having less wealth than white people?

I understand this concept quite well. The disparity in wealth accumulation in our country has been traced to a large degree to unfair housing policies in deed restrictions/covenants as well as disparities in mortgage lending (e.g. redlining). While these practices are no longer legal, the likelihood of generational wealth having been created among white landowners is greater than for people of color. Just recently, the USDA was found to have discriminated against African American farmers, leading to many to have lost their farmland due to limited access to capital, as is typically required to run a farm (Source).

Would you support procurement policies in housing that create a preference system for minority and disadvantaged businesses? [YES, as is common practice is federally regulated industries] / Would you take a leadership role on this? [YES]

no further answer

What do you think the town can do now to enhance equity as it relates to housing?

Due to proven disparities in wages an inventory of attainable housing may lead to opportunity for more representation in homebuyers. The Town cannot control wages in the private sector, though by ensuring that there is a variety of inventory that include affordable and attainable housing, it will be more likely that progress in equity can be made. This is the concept that by providing opportunities to all and fostering inclusive culture, equity will come along with it.

What role do you think neighbors should be able to have when considering affordable housing in their neighborhood?

Neighbors do have the potential to be impacted by developments that overly impact the shared infrastructure, such as roads and schools, so development should certainly be mindful of their concerns. A challenge seen in Erie is that there are far more people who are willing to acknowledge that affordable housing is an issue than those who are willing to suggest that the solution be brought to their neighborhood. This is something that could benefit from some guided dialogue to explore the potential options, as a concentration of affordable units in a sector away from existing neighborhoods is less effective and may create new equity issues that were less prevalent. Cooperative and collaborative solution making can prove much more effective.

Should Erie create an eviction legal defense program like the one in place in Boulder to help people retain their housing? It’s far less expensive than building new housing. [It depends]

no further answer

Recently after the fires, there has been evidence of price gouging by landlords taking advantage of a disaster. Do you think local governments should have a regulatory role in keeping those practices from the community?

Yes, to some degree, market prices for rent are easy to benchmark and track. Price gouging attempts should be easily ascertained and should be noted for the State Attorney General to address. There will need to still be a free market system for landlords who are subject to the free market for ownership of their property, though preying on people who are already experiencing a crisis driven by natural disaster is something that should not be allowed to occur.

What role do you see for our town government in limiting vacation rentals and investor-owned property as a way of keeping housing costs down?

I believe that vacation rentals and investor-owned property in Town should be registered. I also believe that vacation rentals have proven to be more impactful on their neighborhoods than traditional rental properties, with reports of VRBO party houses being of greater impact on surrounding properties. We learned from Denver that multiple VRBOs owned by the same person contributed to their housing shortage and caused prices to rise unnaturally. In Home Rule municipalities, it is not uncommon for vacation rentals to be subject to lodging taxes, though as a Statutory Town Erie is not able to make such an assessment.

Would you support lifting the state statute banning local governments from addressing high rents through rent stabilization measures of some kind? Are there incentives the town could provide to landlords who keep rents from skyrocketing?

I would need to learn more about this concept before making any sort of commitment. Incentives to maintain a healthy inventory mix on its face sounds like a good idea.

However, having local governments put into a position to have to stabilize a delicate housing market could prove problematic if not implemented well.

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