Scene Stealers: March 2017

Published on: March 26th, 2017

ed-picks-social-distortionSocial Distortion at Boulder Theater
“I wanna see honest heartfelt songwriting that’s real. That’s the good stuff.” That quote was how we ended our interview with Mike Ness almost a decade ago, and if you could pick one sentence to sum up his own approach to music, that’s it. The front man for punk icons Social Distortion hasn’t let up in almost 40 years, from Mommy’s Little Monster (Time Bomb Recordings, 1983) through Hard Times and Nursery Rhymes (Epitaph, 2011), and a few solo recordings and guest appearances in between. Though there’s no material out yet, you can believe these road-weary punk vets still bring the bombast you know and love them for. At the Boulder Theater, March 29, 7 p.m., $40+, bouldertheater.com

The Funky Meters at Fox Theatre
When a musician finds a perfect complement in another — someone with whose musical conversations result in something that transcends the art of a song — the problem becomes neither of them want to stop talking. Ever. Art Neville and George Porter Jr. having been doing since the 1960s — first as The Meters, and since 1994 as The Funky Meters, after a greater lineup shift. In 2014, longtime drummer David Batiste Jr. retired and Terrence Houston joined the fold, and nary a beat was missed. All they do is tour and jam, which is reflected in a discography of exactly one album — a 2010 outing, Live At The 2010 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival (MunckMix Live Recordings). But this is a ba nd you go see live anyway. At the Fox Theatre, March 23, 8 p.m., $35+, foxtheatre.com

Carrie Newcomer at Chautauqua Auditorium
There’s probably going to be a time when Carrie Newcomer’s name becomes ironic — if her sound’s any indication, the maturity in her voice and songwriting belies the idea that she might have just appeared out of the ether. Indeed, the Indiana-bred singer/songwriter’s been around for decades, with almost 20 albums under her belt, several of which were packaged with collections of poems and essays. Her latest outing, The Beautiful Not Yet (Available Light Records, 2016), is a roots-influenced effort with banjoist Jayme Stone replete with lush string arrangements and lilting melodies. In short, she’s a guaranteed hit in BoCo. See her at Chautauqua Auditorium April 8 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 at chautauqua.com.

A Perfect Circle at First Bank Center
As side projects go, you’d be hard pressed to find one as powerful and popular as Tool frontman Maynard James Keenan’s moonlighting gig with former Tool and Fishbone guitar tech Billy Howerdel and ex-Vandals drummer Josh Freese. A Perfect Circle’s been around since their first gig at the Viper Room in L.A. in 1999, dropping four fantastic albums, including 2013’s Stone & Echo: Recorded Live at Red Rocks Amphitheatre (Junketboy Records), proving there’s more than enough room for multiple art-metal acts with Keenan at the helm in this world. Now on tour for the first time in six years — sans new album — A Perfect Circle’s penchant for theatrics and spectacle will certainly deliver the shot in the arm fans are clamoring for. At First Bank Center (all ages), April 17, 8 p.m., $39.50+, 1stbankcenter.com.

scene-spiral-arm-by-andrew-beckhamMonth of Photography Exhibitions in Denver
March is the Month of Photography in Denver, so it’s the perfect time to explore all the incredible photography galleries around you. From March 10 through April 9 at RedLine (2350 Arapahoe St. in Denver) see Every Breath We Drew, a photographic exhibition that “explores the power of identity, desire and connection through portraits of the artist and others in the LGBTQ community. Created by Jess T. Dugan, this exciting new exhibition has already been seen in the pages of the New York Times, The Boston Globe and on CNN. You’ll also want to check out Varied Perceptions at Art Gym (1460 Leyden St., Denver) which presents a look at amazing photos that defy any sort of categorization. These photos use bacteria, seeds, chemicals and other unconventional methods to explore the world. Get more information about the exhibitions and check out everything else on the Month of Photography project at mopdenver.com.

Blood Privilege at Theatre Company of Lafayette
The Theatre Company of Lafayette is hard at work presenting an as-yet unpublished play by former Boulder resident Don Fried Blood Privilege. This work, set in 16th Century Hungary, is about Elizabeth Bathory, known as the Blood Countess. According to legends, Bathory was one of the most renowned serial killers of all time, and this production explores her story, beginning with childhood and following through to the King’s court in which she served. With themes covering everything from feminism to political power to sexuality and morality, there is a lot here to consider, and it should be a fascinating evening of original theater. Blood Privilege runs through March 25 with tickets ranging from $10-$16. The Theatre Company of Lafayette performs at the historic Mary Miller Theater at 300 E. Simpson Street in Lafayette, (720) 209-2154, tclstage.org

Month of Photography Exhibitions in Denver
March is the Month of Photography in Denver, so it’s the perfect time to explore all the incredible photography galleries around you. From March 10 through April 9 at RedLine (2350 Arapahoe St. in Denver) see Every Breath We Drew, a photographic exhibition that “explores the power of identity, desire and connection through portraits of the artist and others in the LGBTQ community. Created by Jess T. Dugan, this exciting new exhibition has already been seen in the pages of the New York Times, The Boston Globe and on CNN. You’ll also want to check out Varied Perceptions at Art Gym (1460 Leyden St., Denver) which presents a look at amazing photos that defy any sort of categorization. These photos use bacteria, seeds, chemicals and other unconventional methods to explore the world. Get more information about the exhibitions and check out everything else on the Month of Photography project at mopdenver.com.

Blood Privilege at Theatre Company of Lafayette
The Theatre Company of Lafayette is hard at work presenting an as-yet unpublished play by former Boulder resident Don Fried Blood Privilege. This work, set in 16th Century Hungary, is about Elizabeth Bathory, known as the Blood Countess. According to legends, Bathory was one of the most renowned serial killers of all time, and this production explores her story, beginning with childhood and following through to the King’s court in which she served. With themes covering everything from feminism to political power to sexuality and morality, there is a lot here to consider, and it should be a fascinating evening of original theater. Blood Privilege runs through March 25 with tickets ranging from $10-$16. The Theatre Company of Lafayette performs at the historic Mary Miller Theater at 300 E. Simpson Street in Lafayette, (720) 209-2154, tclstage.org

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